columbus art and design museum

spring 2017 - arch 202 

professor: philipp heidemann

The design of Vogue-Arch is explained in the name, as a current style that is curvilinear. Columbus, Indiana is known for housing Modernist Architecture by famous architects such as Eero Saarinen, Robert Venturi, I.M. Pei, and many more, with the goal of creating a rich city that has an icon. Columbus also seeks to further their architecture with the growing trends and transitions through modernism. Vogue-Arch was developed from the idea of how modernism has changed through the growing software advances. With expanding use of technology and variety of different softwares, architecture can now be created through curvilinear shapes and complex geometries. Modernism continues to show its honesty of materials and shapes, but now originally orthogonal can now explore unorthogonal shapes and spaces. This design takes the basic perpendicular cube with chamfered edges, and extrudes the shape through geometries that are curved when reaching the entrance of Columbus and redirecting the path to the heart of the city

Just as the context of the site is bordered by curvilinear circulation paths, the building form acts to mimic this. The building utilizes intertwining geometry that weaves the different programs into a central and radial circulation path. Guests are able to easily navigate through the different curved meshes once they reach the central atrium space. Each separate curved mesh is molded based off the program of that space. The gallery spaces occupy the second floor, and the multifunction event space remains on the first floor to allow the events to spill out onto the out foor plazas. Interior spaces are very open and free-flowing in order to capture daylighting from the large window facades, and are aided with indentions of skylights for larger gallery spaces. With hardwood having a large influence on the material choice, it was used in this design for its best qualities. Wood material is known for being water resistant, acoustically sound, very durable, and a great insulator. For this reason, hardwood is used for the furniture, exterior cladding, sound paneling, and the main egress circulation paths. This material is also sustainable being produced locally in Indiana, using less embodied energy, and being a renewable and biodegradable resource.

 

1st floor plan with site plan

2nd floor plan

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3rd floor plan

 

columbus art and design museum 

spring 2017 - arch 202

professor: philipp heidemann

nicholas bloom

The proposed Art and Design Museum for Columbus, IN abstracts the concept developed for the Mill Race Park covered bridge. The park is near the site and is a part of Columbus’ history. The design utilizes two crossed rectangular forms which was derived from the bridge which crosses the pond; they are both axial forms. The museum celebrates this junction with a decorative staircase, railing, gathering area beneath the stairs, and a cafe nearby. The main forms have been situated to face directions of traffic (pedestrian and vehicular). The two pieces also taper/open up to downtown Columbus. These forms each contain a shed roof and inward sloped end faces which were extracted from the bridge’s construction. Wood is utilized to attract museum visitors to gathering areas (multi-purpose entrance, cafe seating below stair). The wood provided at these locations is at a height that can be interactive. 

The first floor utilizes a darker colored concrete to “ground” the visitors while the second floor uses a light colored wood to create a sense of purity. The landscape leading up to the museum gradually angles inward on the visitors to draw them in. Upon entering the structure, the angled walls and high ceiling gives a sense of relief and openness. The large cantilever from the gallery spaces creates an exterior dining area for cafe-goers to be able to obtain an indoor-outdoor experience. This architectural expression provides shading from mid-morning to mid afternoon.

 

columbus art and design museum 

spring 2017 - arch 202

professor: philipp heidemann

antonio medina

Columbus is well-known for its abundant architecture designed by well-known architects, making Columbus what it is by providing an identity. With a consistent motion toward Modernism provided by those leading architects, the plan for this design was to enhance the discourse provided to accomplish aesthetic and progressive movement. The design intent focused on movement and pushing forward. This design pursues the idea of Columbus pushing forward and moving away from the past while also paying respect to what made Columbus the city it is today. With a focus placed on sharpness as it relates to the perception of movement, the design stretches with the landscape. As residents and visitors drive past the museum, it would give the perception of forward movement with Columbus.

lower level floor plan

east facade

west facade

south facade

north facade

1st floor plan

2nd floor plan

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manifesting muncie

spring 2017 - arch 202 

professor: matthew wilson

amy baran

This project offers a systematic and “flexible kit of parts that form living and working spaces” for an arts community that seeks to “incrementally regenerate post-industrial Muncie”. On visiting the proposed building site – the former Muncie Chevrolet Transmissions plant – I witnessed patterns of greenery sprouting up through the asphalt of the old parking lot. These strands of nature looked like green threads weaving a new fabric among the rubble and lackluster material left from the old factory. This pattern, mirrored the basic form of a rhombus, and was what eventually inspired not only the base pattern for my ‘kit of parts’ but introduced the language in which I wanted to represent the life of each of my three: a gardener, an apothecary, and a weaver. The weaver in particular, played a major role in the design of this space, because their goods would serve as the centerpiece of a public gallery. The art of weaving is a fairly portable skill, which means that a specific studio space isn’t necessarily essential, and instead the weavers studio can be a collection of smaller areas throughout the building to promote continuous movement, and interaction with others. The gardener is represented through the base of the building and the surrounding site; it is, after all, imperative to have a gardener produce food, herbs and materials for the apothecary and weaver to use for their careers. Thus, not only do the activities of the three artists weave together, but so do the internal and external spaces of the site and the structural kit of parts that envelopes it.

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