the museum of the emphemeral

spring 2017 - arch 302

professor: ana de brea

ben slightom / alayna davidson

Molten & primordial, a monument is poured—fleeting effects frozen into rigid stasis, skewered on the grids of its host. The hot steel lasts for but a second, its metamorphosis caught for all time in grotesque convolutions.

Where does one object begin and another end, and why are we driven by the need to draw boundaries? The city enfolds the seething mass; together they emote: in the warm underbelly new life is bred, blurring boundaries between art and life. An ephemeral collection, caught like smoke on flickering screens, phantom limbs bridging between ego and environment. We are all plugged in, linked by the boxes we hold in our hands: your life, caught by collective memory, now trending in gallery B.

Against rigidity, against permanence, against closed walls and private spaces, the digital consumes the real in one rather pleasant feeling. When we plug ourselves in we become like artists, opening a new dimension of human experience, extending our bodies across space and time. 

 

open art + life

spring 2017 - arch 302 / competition

professor: ana de brea

allison hoagland

OPEN Art + Life began as an exploration on how to break down boundaries between art and life. There are many physical and mental thresholds that have to be crossed to enter the realm of the typical museum: entrance fees, a commitment to spend several hours there, and the walls themselves. You have to go out of your way to visit a museum, which is enough to prevent the vast majority of the population from having any interaction with the contents of the museum on a daily basis. Art and life should not be separated, which led to the most extreme stance of the project, removing all walls on the ground level and making over half of the allotted square footage of the galleries exposed in a similar manor. In this way, the design allows for people to experience art on their own terms. They are free to pass through, linger, or explore the exhibits. The required auditorium is not an enclosed space but faces out towards the heart of Indianapolis. It becomes a means to broadcast ideas that are inclusive of the entire community and should not be contained.

The art of OPEN Art + Life is the art of emerging artists. It is of art that may be unconventional, that breaks the academic traditions celebrated in existing art museums. It is art but, outsider art. The Cartesian grid seems entirely wrong for this sort of artistic expression. Steel allowed the opportunity to break the grid and thus break the expectations of what art is and the experience people have with art. The established routine of visiting an art museum is to walk around quietly looking at a work for maybe 30 seconds before moving on to the next piece and then repeating the process. OPEN Art + Life removes expectations. There is no clear path set for the visitor. They must think about where they are going and uncover their own path leading to a more meaningful experience. Such is life.

Art is constantly evolving. To prevent my architecture from becoming a casket where art and ideas stagnate, I allotted a tenth of the square footage to makerspaces and classrooms, which are pointedly located at the highest elevation of the design. These spaces invite people to find their own means of expression.

site plan

structure

elevation

exterior perspective

interior

 

mia: museum of interactive art

spring 2017 - arch 302 / competition 

professor: michele chuini

megan york / morgan cook

The Museum of Interactive Art morphs form and function into a new urban installation. It simultaneously addresses ever-evolving Indianapolis culture and environment while creating an interactive atmosphere through its form, skin, and program. One single form is manipulated - not just for program, but to enhance views, correspond with the surrounding context, pay homage to Indianapolis culture, and spark interaction throughout the entire design and site. Orchestrating a display of interactive art and installations, the program enhances an architectural environment through the stimulation of all five senses. The building’s reflective skin distorts the surrounding context of the site. It also has voids to reveal the structure and concealment to protect exhibits. Ultimately, this interactive architecture invites visitors to experience the site through movement.

interior

south elevation

site plan

interior

circulation

exploded floor plans

 

chicago tiny skyscraper

spring 2017 - arch 302 

professor: michele chiuni 

megan york 

The design embraces the historic value of Chicago steel structures while simultaneously emphasizing the architectural details of today’s net-zero strategies. The skeleton is inspired from traditional steel structure in the surrounding Chicago area; the skins of white terracotta and the ivy-like PV panels angled on the facades integrate the polarity of environmental design and abstracted forms from Chicago’s architectural past.

The structure is composed of traditional steel with a white terracotta skin cladding system. The second skin acts as the building’s net-zero energy strategy, an organic form of thin film PV panels.

The design itself was to express its net-zero energy strategies as well as other passive and active systems. The main architectural feature of the facades is the jagged and undulating forms of the black thin film PV panels; there is over 6,250 square feet of solar panels applied to the building and generates 4.5 million kWh of electricity and heating for the building.

Another vital design strategy is the abstracted Chicago bay window. Reflecting a truly integral design in Chicago’s architectural history, the bay window has a fixed south window pane and operable east/west panes. The contemporary net-zero building design abstracted the Chicago window, creating it in a more 90 degree orientation for summer wind patterns.

Other net-zero design strategies include radiant flooring systems, the fire stairs acting as a source for stack ventilation, wind turbines located on the rooftop, an intensive green roof, shading devices, vegetation balconies, and a geothermal heat pump system for heating and cooling.

interior

 exterior perspective

exterior perspective

structure 

floor plans

 

exterior

resolute

spring 2017 - arch 302 / competition

professor: michele chiuni 

luke ralston

Museums hold a culture’s creative heritage and preserve memories of contributing artists. The design’s footprint is rotated ten degrees off-axis from the city grid, orienting the tower to face the state house and addressing the devaluation of the arts.

Art encapsulates emotional power. The power of art is found in viewers’ imaginations and memories, therefore affecting each viewer differently. Evoking power, the museum’s coherent visible form rests as an island podium, emphasizing the tremendous weight of the gallery spaces above.

Circulation through the museum begins with an elevator ride to the roof garden. From the roof, visitors descend through the galleries using the monolithic stairs. The transistional space becomes a resting point between galleries. Returning to the ground level, cafes and shops invite visitors to remain around the site to enjoy the rest of their day.

Beneath the tower and spread across the western edge of the site rests the subgrade support programs, including mechanical, administrative, and storage space. Depressing these programmatic spaces allows the gallery tower to stand resolute.

exterior perspective - across park

cafe perspective

exterior perspective -  down green way trail 

gallery perspective 

floor plans 

floor plan